Game tv

IN Response to “Habits of Successful People: Watching Less Television” by Danny Ray


Once again Danny from DREAM BIG, DREAM OFTEN wrote an article that I could not resist and participate in by providing my two cents worth. This is a great topic and I wish more would take notice as to what is really going around them when it comes to watching too much TV.

Here is the Comment I left for Danny:

During the 90’s while at Butte College (the same college Arron Rogers went to school), I had an SBA, Stockbroker, investor instructor telling us the TV was nothing more than a Boob tube. Although I do watch certain shows in the evening but during the day anywhere from 6 to 12 hours that Boob tube is off, has anyone ever wondered why they feel sleepy when watching TV or fall asleep in the chair while the Golf or Football game is on, that is because our brains produce Melatonin which is secreted by the pineal gland in the brain. This natural chemical in our brain aids in the sleep process and is why some Doctors say it’s ok to watch TV while in bed for the night.
As for gaming, I enjoy FPS games and others though I am not one to spend 80 to 90 bucks on said games, never have and never will I just wait the year or three out and get it for 10 to 12 bucks at the pawn shops or other outlets, but I don’t spend too much time at the console either. I have been known to play one game to the finish in one setting, so I view that as a holiday, time away from stress, releasing frustrations on a fake animated object, time away from stupid people that drain me dry.
Getting back to the TV, more and more I see parents of today using the TV as a babysitter and this topic has been mentioned in several media outlets in the past, but still occurs today. I feel children should be out, using their minds, making discoveries, smelling that rose and finding out what that thorn does. The mind should soar and be free to create and imaginative without distractions of persuasions of commercials and or subliminal, suggestive messages in certain cartoons and or shows of today.”

I am not saying that all TV watching is bad, but for the most part –YES! As most of you know I have CRPS from a needed surgery then found myself unemployed. What do I do with all this time if I am not being a couch potato? Well, I’ll tell you.

During the day, I do not watch TV also referred as the Boob tube. That TV stays off during the day sometimes for twelve hours until Deb gets home.  Granted when it’s game day, I can not help but to watch and relive some past glory of yesterday or to watch old clips of Chi-Chi Rodríguez, I think Danny would know who he is,  but that is another topic. Boob tube you say, yes, there have been many articles in the past referring the TV as one definition of Boob Tube: Boob, foolish or stupid person, Tube is the tubes from Old Television sets. However, it is now just referred to as the idiot box in modern times.  I did find an article that was published in 1994 in the Los Angeles Times on this topic,” It’s Called the Boob Tube for a Good Reason”  Another great article I found is from wiseGEEK, “What is a Boob Tube?”

Besides looking for employment that would cater to meet my needs, I network, I think and ponder as most Introverts do. I write, I might even dig out my Visual Studio and write a small program. I call relatives or send emails to stay in touch, some have busy lives and email is the best way to stay in touch with certain ones.  😦  Sometimes, I’ll grab a pen and paper and write a letter and snail mail it.

When I get a notice from Facebook that someone’s birthday is coming up, I either find a card or make one and wish them a happy birthday to foster that relationship. That way they know I have not forgotten them and it builds that relationship.

I find old photos and do my best to bring them back to life, who knows it might become a side job later on. Building that portfolio. I dabble in Genealogy as most know that was the beginning of this Blog then learning about Audience Dynamics changed the course of this little Blog to display the poems and short stories that I write and when I did that I started gaining new followers once the word got out.

I read quite a bit, perhaps not the hardbound books (although I have several laying around or stored) that produce that aroma of AW, I find most online like most of us do today since we are in the electronic age. Maybe DIY videos and learn how to do something.

The point of all this is that we spend too much time looking at moving images when we should be fostering our minds.

I just got a comment from Haylee who left me this comment and was a profound one at that!

“Sticking my two pence in (you know, because I’m British and we don’t have cents!)
I feel there’s TV, bad TV and a good and bad time to watch good TV.
As a teacher, we see all too often the effects of too little sleep, too much TV/gaming. But that doesn’t mean that what they are interacting with is bad, just at an inappropriate time. Yes, there is a LOT of mindless nonsense on TV but there are some fascinating, thought provoking dramas, documentaries and even quiz shows that keep the brain active.
For many, TV is a lifeline. My grandfather is bed ridden (96 yrs) but he streams his favourite programmes through his iPad – still learning about world history, deliberating over the tactics employed in a sports game, or catching up on local news. And he gets to travel – virtually of course – but see the world how he never imagined. His perspective of never growing up with the technology we have now means he appreciates the benefits TV brings.
He rode his bike everywhere, everyday up until 2 years ago, doing 100+ sit ups daily. Fitter than most 50 year olds, never mind a nonagenarian! But he LOVES TV. The difference to being a couch potato? Like you said, it wasn’t on constantly, but used in moderation, to enhance his life, not rule it.
In the classroom, I’m a huge advocate of gaming – Minecraft has valuable lessons with its format and it’s no surprise that many children an now identify and know the properties of rocks etc, simply from engaging in this game. There are many more games that can assist learning too. And as for TV, YouTube and classroom documentaries, again when used in moderation can bring a lesson to life, appealing to the different types of learners.
So, I believe TV gets a bad name – used appropriately it can have massive benefits to an individual. But like with many things (for example guns), it’s not the machine that’s at fault, but the humans who use them and are unable to exercise control.
Two pence spent!”

 

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11 thoughts on “IN Response to “Habits of Successful People: Watching Less Television” by Danny Ray”

  1. Sticking my two pence in (you know, because I’m British and we don’t have cents!)

    I feel there’s TV, bad TV and a good and bad time to watch good TV.

    As a teacher, we see all too often the effects of too little sleep, too much TV/gaming. But that doesn’t mean that what they are interacting with is bad, just at an inappropriate time. Yes, there is a LOT of mindless nonsense on TV but there are some fascinating, thought provoking dramas, documentaries and even quiz shows that keep the brain active.
    For many, TV is a lifeline. My grandfather is bed ridden (96 yrs) but he streams his favourite programmes through his iPad – still learning about world history, deliberating over the tactics employed in a sports game, or catching up on local news. And he gets to travel – virtually of course – but see the world how he never imagined. His perspective of never growing up with the technology we have now means he appreciates the benefits TV brings.

    He rode his bike everywhere, everyday up until 2 years ago, doing 100+ sit ups daily. Fitter than most 50 year olds, never mind a nonagenarian! But he LOVES TV. The difference to being a couch potato? Like you said, it wasn’t on constantly, but used in moderation, to enhance his life, not rule it.

    In the classroom, I’m a huge advocate of gaming – Minecraft has valuable lessons with its format and it’s no surprise that many children an now identify and know the properties of rocks etc, simply from engaging in this game. There are many more games that can assist learning too. And as for TV, YouTube and classroom documentaries, again when used in moderation can bring a lesson to life, appealing to the different types of learners.

    So, I believe TV gets a bad name – used appropriately it can have massive benefits to an individual. But like with many things (for example guns), it’s not the machine that’s at fault, but the humans who use them and are unable to exercise control.

    Two pence spent!

    Liked by 1 person

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